Author Archives: mountsinaitceee

Allan Just named one of the “20 Pioneers Under 40 in Environmental Public Health”

Allan Just, PhD was named one of the “20 Pioneers Under 40 in Environmental Public Health” by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment. These 20 pioneering researchers and advocates were nominated by a committee of senior leaders and luminaries in environmental public health. The Collborative on Health and the Environmentl will be launching a series of 10 webinars that will feature the work of the next generation of environmental health scientists and advocates in a new series beginning on October 4. Chosen for exceptional levels of accomplishment in work that is rigorous, dynamic, and builds critical knowledge, the 20 speakers’ work promises to drive environmental health science and advocacy in new directions that will demonstrate the many links between the environment and public health and catalyze policies and actions that will protect the health of children, families, and communities. Our center congratulates Allan Just on this recognition! To learn more click here

Dr. Stingone’s Research Featured in the American Journal of Epidemiology

Dr. Stingone’s research “Maternal Exposure to Nitrogen Dioxide, Intake of Methyl Nutrients, and Congenital Heart Defects in Offspring” was featured in the American Journal of Epidmiology. The study looks at how nutrients that regulate methylation processes may modify susceptibility to the effects of air pollutants. To learn more click here.

Dr. Shanna Swan’s Research was featured in NYT Article

On August 16, 2017, Dr. Shanna Swan’s research was highlighted in the New York Times article, “Sperm Count in Western Men Has Dropped Over 50 Percent Since 1973, Paper Finds.” Dr. Swan’s research study “Temporal trends in sperm count: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis”, which was featured in the NYT article, looks at the decline of sperm count in Western countries. By examining thousands of studies and conducting a meta-analysis of 185 — the most comprehensive effort to date — an international team of researchers ultimately looked at semen samples from 42,935 men from 50 countries from 1973 to 2011. They found that sperm concentration — the number of sperm per milliliter of semen — had declined each year, amounting to a 52.4 percent total decline, in men from North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Total sperm count among the same group also tumbled each year for a total decline of 59.3 percent over the nearly 40-year period. To read the article click here.

P30 Center Member’s Maganese Paper highlighted as CEHN Article of the Month

P30 Center Member’s paper, Maternal and Cord Blood Manganese Concentrations and Early Childhood Neurodevelopment among Residents near a Mining-Impacted Superfund Site, was featured as The August Article of the Month (AOM) by the Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN). The study examined the connection between prenatal manganese exposure and neurodevelopmental deficits in children living near a Superfund site. Elevated levels of manganese is believed to be caused by the proximity to the Superfund site. The Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund Program cleans up hazardous waste and protects our nation’s vulnerable populations—it must be well-funded to continue this vital work. Check out the entire August Article of the Month for more information!

Dr. Shanna Swan featured in Washington Post article “Sperm concentration has declined 50 percent in 40 years in three continents”

Dr. Shanna Swan

P30 Center Member, Dr. Shanna Swan, was interviewed by the Washington Post regarding the decline of male reproductive health.

 

The quality of sperm from men in North America, Europe and Australia has declined dramatically over the past 40 years, with a 52.4 percent drop in sperm concentration, according to a study published in the Human Reproduction Update. The research — the largest and most comprehensive look at the topic, involving data from 185 studies and 42,000 men around the world between 1973 and 2011 — appears to confirm fears that male reproductive health may be declining. The state of male fertility has been one of the most hotly debated subjects in medical science in recent years. While a number of previous studies found that sperm counts and quality have been falling, some dismissed or criticized the studies over factors such as the age of the men included, the size of the study, bias in counting systems or other aspects of the methodologies.

 

Dr. Shanna H. Swan, one of the authors of the new study published in the Human Reproduction Update, said that the new meta-analysis is so broad and comprehensive, involving all the relevant research published in English, that she hoped it would put some of the uncertainty to rest. Then the scientific community could move forward into putting its resources into figuring out the why of what is going on, she said. “It shows the decline is strong and that the decline is continuing,” Swan said in an interview. To read the full article click here.

Dr. Wright featured on Environmental Health Perspectives “Mixed Metals Exposures in Children” Podcasts

In this podcast host Ashley Ahearn discusses the neurodevelopmental effects of metals mixtures with researcher P30 Center Director, Robert O. Wright.

 

In our daily lives we’re rarely exposed to just one chemical at a time. Metals, for example, are ubiquitous in the environment, and most of us are exposed to different combinations of metals each day through air, water, and food. Simultaneous exposures to different metals may have synergistic effects in children, whose developing brains are particularly vulnerable to adverse effects from these potentially neurotoxic agents. To listen to the full podcast click here.

Dr. Perry Sheffield featured in Yale Climate Connections Article “More asthma attacks expected in warmer climate”

On July 19, 2017, Dr. Perry Sheffield was interviewed by Yale Climate Connections to weigh in on how longer and hotter summers, associated with continued climate change, are creating hotspots of bad air across the nation. Dr. Sheffield stated “As a pediatrician, I worry most about children, because their lungs are still growing and because they breathe faster than adults. Because of those reasons, they are more affected by bad air quality like ozone and ragweed pollen.” To read the full article click here.

Dr. Perry Sheffield featured in USA today Article “127M Americans at risk of air-quality ‘double whammy’ of smog, ragweed pollen”

Dr. Perry Sheffield

On July 2017, Dr. Perry Sheffield was featured in the USA Today article “127M Americans at risk of air-quality ‘double whammy’ of smog, ragweed pollen.” Dr. Perry Sheffield discussed why clean air is so important for human health since it doesn’t just impact the lungs, it also affects the brain, heart and skin. To read the full article click here.

 

“Using Team Science to Understand the Exposome and Children’s Health” Featured as NIEHS Story of Success

P30 Center Director, Bob Wright, M.D.

Dr. Robert Wright’s exposome work, “Using Team Science to Understand the Exposome and Children’s Health”, work was featured as an NIEHS Story of Success. As director of the NIEHS-funded Transdisciplinary Center on Health Effects of Early Environmental Exposures (TCEEE), Wright promotes the team science approach. He also advocates the need for investigators in multiple disciplines to perform exposomics research, including experts in molecular biology, genetics, exposure science, biostatistics, analytical chemistry, and environmental modeling. To read the full NIEHS article click here.